Mangoes

After mangling the first fresh mango that I attempted to cut up, I primarily purchased frozen mixed fruit that included mango chunks. My morning fruit smoothies are easy to make using unsweetened frozen fruit. However, I’ve learned how to properly cut up this small, powerful fruit. Fresh mango, eaten alone or mixed with other fruits, can’t be beat.

Mangoes

What are Mangoes?

The mango is a tropical fruit with an outer fleshy part surrounding a seed, or pit. Mangoes, native to South Asia, are widely distributed throughout the world now, earning it the name “king of fruits”. In fact, mangoes are considered the most consumed fruit in the world.

There are many different kinds of mangoes. They range in color, shape, flavor, and seed size. While the skin color of mangoes can vary from green to red, yellow, or orange, the inner flesh of the mango is mostly a golden yellow, and it is notoriously difficult to separate from the pit. The fruit has a sweet and creamy taste.

Mangoes

Health Benefits of Mangoes

In Life Changing Foods Anthony William shares that the mango is a miraculous sleep aid. When consumed before bed, the phytochemicals in mangoes, combined with the fruit’s amino acids, fructose and glucose, travel to the brain and quickly restore depleted neurotransmitters. This allows for true rest during the night.

Mangoes are also beneficial for stress relief, viral protection and calming the central nervous system. Rich in beta-carotene, mangoes strengthen and support the skin and help to prevent skin cancers. They reverse hypoglycemia, prediabetes, and type 2 diabetes. Plus the fruit’s pulp soothes the stomach and intestinal tract.

Bringing more mangoes into the diet helps with these disorders: Alzheimer’s, dementia, Parkinson’s, epilepsy, Grave’s disease, ADHD, ulcers, stomach cancer, Hashimoto’s, glaucoma, Crohn’s disease, PTSD, urinary tract infections, depression, anxiety, adrenal fatigue, infertility, muscle cramps and pain, constipation, sluggish liver, high cholesterol and high blood pressure.

Mangoes

Mangoes

How to Cut Up a Mango

Follow these easy steps, to cut up a mango:

1) Stand the mango up and slice from top to bottom, avoiding the pit. Turn fruit and slice off the other side. You should have two halves and a central section containing the seed.

2) Score the mango halves, cutting through the flesh without cutting through the outer skin.

3) Remove the cubes of mango by scraping the cut sections with a spoon or by sliding a knife between the flesh and skin. I cut the strips into long sections and fillet off the flesh (see photo above).Cut the narrow strips from either side of the pit, slice through the flesh, and fillet off.

Use mangoes in smoothies, salsas and salads, eat alone or combined with other fruits. Frozen mango chunks, combined with frozen bananas, makes a great soft serve type dessert that is naturally sweet and oh so delicious.

Mangoes

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Two Raw Apple Treats

The 10th day of the Apple Challenge presents the perfect opportunity to offer not one, but two delicious treats. I’m grateful for the many recipes that author and teacher Anthony William offers. Both of these scrumptious and easy to prepare recipes are his.

Two Raw Apple Treats

Raw Applesauce

I prepared this simple dish a couple of nights ago, to include with a veggie bowl that included baked potatoes, steamed cauliflower and tomatoes fresh from the garden.

Raw Applesauce

4 apples, cored and diced

4 dates, pitted

2 stalks of celery, chopped

1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

Combine all ingredients in a blender and blend until a smooth, even applesauce forms. Serve immediately. Makes two servings. If there are leftovers, sprinkle fresh lemon juice over the applesauce and seal tightly. Store in refrigerator.

This recipe came together in minutes, and it was so good. I purposefully left my applesauce slightly chunky. And when I discovered I was out of dates, I substituted 1 tablespoon of organic maple syrup. The applesauce was the perfect accompaniment for the veggies.

Two Raw Apple Treats

Apple Pie Smoothie

I made these cold frosty smoothies after dinner, as a special treat.

Apple Pie Smoothie

2 red apples, cored and cut into chunks

1 1/2 – 2 frozen bananas, chunked

1 1/2 cups almond or coconut milk, unsweetened

1 tablespoon organic maple syrup OR 1 date

3/4 teaspoon cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ground ginger

Pinch of nutmeg

Combine all ingredients in a blender. Blend until smooth. Add more almond milk or water, if needed. Serve immediately. Makes two servings.

Two Raw Apple Treats

What a treat this was! The blended drink was thick and very cold, and did indeed taste like apple pie. The smoothie could be served as a meal replacement for breakfast, lunch or dinner. Or, as I discovered, it makes an excellent after dinner treat.

I am loving the Apple Challenge and getting my three apples a day in a variety of ways. And I know my liver is benefiting, as is the rest of my body. Watch for more nutritious and fun recipes as the challenge continues!

Two Raw Apple Treats

Parsley

This green leafy herb is recognized by most people as the garnish on their plate in a restaurant. Until recently, I would never have considered eating the garnish. What a deeply ingrained perception, to view parsley as decoration rather than the powerful healing food that it is. I’m glad my perceptions have changed!

Parsley

What is parsley?

Parsley is a species of flowering plants native to the central Mediterranean region that includes southern Italy, Greece, Portugal, Spain, Malta, Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia. It is naturalized in Europe, and grown across the US. The plant is widely cultivated as an herb, spice and vegetable.

Parsley is often used in European, Middle Eastern and American cooking. The curly variety is most frequently placed on a plate of food as garnish. Beyond its culinary and decorative uses, this aromatic herb also has many health benefits.

Parsley

Benefits of parsley

Parsley is a nutrient dense food, full of vitamins such as B12, B9 (folic acid), A, C and K, and minerals including magnesium, sulfur, iron, zinc, manganese, molybdenum, chromium, selenium, iodine and calcium. The plant thrives well and has an adaptogenic nature, making it an excellent food when the body is weary and depleted.

When the body becomes too acidic, disease is more likely to occur. Parsley is one of the best alkalizing foods, for all systems of the body. It drives out acidity due to the special mineral salts that bind onto unproductive acids. This alkalizing ability makes parsley effective in preventing cancer, which thrives in an acidic body.

The herb fights pathogens, keeps bacteria, parasites and fungus away, and pulls herbicides and pesticides from the body. Parsley helps any mouth related disorder such as gum disease, tooth decay and dry mouth.

Bring more parsley into your life for these symptoms and conditions: cancer, anxiety, depression, adrenal fatigue, Epstein Barr virus, migraines, thyroid disease, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, dementia, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, COPD, endocrine system disorders, hepatitis C, nausea, dizziness, abdominal pain, weight gain, neurological disorders and pre-fatty liver. (Info from Life Changing Foods by Anthony William)

How to use parsley

For maximum benefits, choose flat leaf parsley over curly leaf, although it still has benefits if that’s all that is available. Juice it with celery and other veggies, add it to salads and sprinkle over foods. Fresh parsley can be brewed as a tea also.

Move this crucial herb from the sidelines, of your plate and your perceptions, and embrace the health and vitality it offers. I’ll be adding this plant to my herb garden next spring so I can enjoy it and reap the benefits more often.

Parsley

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Powerful Pomegranates

These colorful fruits are very popular and known primarily for being high in antioxidants. However the pomegranate has amazing health benefits making it a food to indulge in often. Anthony William writes that each juicy ruby colored seed inside powerful pomegranates contains a universe of healing. Breaking open those seeds, called arils, releases the full potential of those tiny universes to come to our aid.

Powerful Pomegranates

When we eat fresh pomegranate seeds a chemical reaction occurs whenever the fruit’s acids, which are full of phytochemicals, come into contact with unhealthy hardenings of bile, protein buildup and toxic forms of calcium. They immediately begin to break down, making pomegranates helpful for dissolving gallstones, kidney stones, nodules, calcifications and small cysts.

This fruit strengthens red and white blood cell counts. It restores glucose reserves in the liver, so that the organ can release glucose into the bloodstream as needed. This helps to protect the adrenal glands. If the liver doesn’t have an adequate supply of glucose then the adrenals are forced to pump hormones such as cortisol into the blood to keep the body going. This can lead to overactive adrenal glands and eventual burnout. Pomegranate’s high quality glucose is excellent for the brain as well, supporting the abilities to focus and concentrate.

Powerful Pomegranates

In addition pomegranates contain trace minerals such as iron, manganese, potassium and chromium that are very bioavailable and easily assimilable, and high levels of vitamins C and K.

Eating pomegranates regularly unclogs pores and hair follicles, encouraging hair growth and benefitting the skin and scalp, lowers blood pressure and eases the symptoms of arthritis.

Pomegranates curb excessive hunger and the tendency to overeat if the seeds are consumed before a meal. They also regulate hormones by flushing out unproductive estrogens that contribute to cancer. Pomegranates detoxify DDT and other pesticides, eliminate lactic acid build up in the muscles and prevents the overproduction of earwax.

Bringing more pomegranates into the diet also helps with these conditions and symptoms: Alzheimer’s, dementia, brain fog, memory loss, insomnia, adrenal fatigue, diabetes, Epstein Barr, Lyme’s disease, Raynaud’s syndrome, polycystic ovarian syndrome, muscle cramps, myelin nerve damage, eye floaters, body pain, head pain, inflammation, itchy skin and hives.

Powerful Pomegranates

So the thing about pomegranates is being able to easily get to those amazing seeds. My first experience with deseeding a pomegranate turned into a huge mess, with seeds everywhere, including on the floor. Very few of those sweet-tart bubbles of goodness ended up in my bowl.

I love pomegranate seeds though, and I persevered. One method that works well is to score the skin around the middle of the fruit and then carefully pry the pomegranate apart into two halves. Gently…oh so gently…flex each half to loosen the seeds. Using any force snaps the fruit into sections and scatters the seeds. Turn the pomegranate half cut side down over a bowl and whack the other side with a wooden spoon. The seeds will fall into the bowl.

I have not tried the bowl of water trick yet, for removing seeds. See this method demonstrated in the video below.

Enjoy pomegranate seeds fresh from the fruit, run through the juicer with other fruits, or sprinkle on salads, hummus, stir fry, or cooked veggies.

Don’t forego enjoying powerful pomegranates because they can be messy to open and deseed. They are well worth the effort. Pomegranates teach us to prepare for life’s messes and embrace them so that we can receive the most from what comes our way.

Powerful Pomegranates

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Miraculous Raw Honey

There are so many reasons to appreciate this golden wild food. Anthony William, author of Life Changing Foods, calls raw, unprocessed honey “nothing less than a miracle from God and the earth”.

Miraculous Raw Honey

Let’s put to rest the main concern about people have about consuming honey: it’s not sugar. Don’t confuse the natural sweetness of this nectar with processed sugar or high fructose corn syrup. The fructose and glucose in honey is good for us. It is full of thousands of phytochemical compounds, including pathogen killers and protectors against radiation damage and cancer. In fact, raw honey can shut down the cancerous growth process in tumors.

Honey is highly absorbable and its B12 coenzymes make it a powerful brain food. Plus raw honey repairs DNA and it is extremely high in minerals such as calcium, potassium, zinc, selenium, phosphorus, chromium, molybdenum and manganese. Its anti inflammatory properties inhibit pathogens from procreating and releasing toxins that further elevate inflammation.

Our immune systems are constantly bombarded by the microorganisms that we encounter. Raw honey, one of the most adaptogenic foods in existence, supports the immune system so it can combat those microorganisms. When we are dealing with a weakened immune system and infectious diseases such as colds, flus and stomach bugs, or food poisoning, raw honey helps strengthen the body’s defense systems.

We can bring more raw honey into our lives to help with these conditions: sinus and ear infections, diabetes, hypoglycemia, allergies, staph infections, MRSA, SIBO, infertility, insomnia, adrenal fatigue, colds, cancers, Alzheimer’s, dementia, memory issues, autoimmune disorders, respiratory infections, bronchitis, joint pain, headaches, stomachaches and dry skin. (Info from Life Changing Foods)

Miraculous Raw Honey

This is how I have brought more honey into my life. I purchase raw organic honey locally. It’s important to purchase honey from local bee keepers because the bees collect pollen from area flowers and plants, including the ones we can have allergic reactions to.

During allergy season, spring and late fall for me, I take a spoonful of raw honey daily, along with an Ester C vitamin and a spoonful of sugar free elderberry syrup, to prevent allergic reactions. I have not had allergy symptoms in two years, and I formerly suffered from severe seasonal allergies.

I add raw honey to a bowl of berries for a special treat and use it in place of sugar in recipes such as curries and sauces. Raw honey is great in turmeric milk, made with unsweetened almond coconut milk, and can be added to herbal teas or lemon water for an extra boost to the immune system. Drizzle it over frozen banana ice cream or chopped apples.

And I add 1/4 teaspoon of raw honey to the face serum that I make, because it is wonderfully restorative to the skin. It also is beneficial for healing small wounds and abrasions and helps to heal scars.

I used to laugh at Winnie the Pooh and his obsession with eating honey. Now I realize that silly old bear was on to something amazing.

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Health Benefits of Coconut

I’ve been aware of the benefits of coconut for some time, primarily through the use of coconut oil. I use coconut oil as a base for skin and hair care products that I make myself. In fact, I just made a batch of my skin serum today, that I’ve been using for years on my face, neck, chest and hands. Find my recipe HERE.

I’ve only recently discovered coconut water…yum…and the extraordinary healing powers found within this wild food.

Health Benefits of Coconut

In his book Life Changing Foods, Anthony William shares that the coconut enhances the power of everything it touches. When combined with any healing food, coconut supercharges it. For example, if coconut water is added to a smoothie that contains parsley, it increases parsley’s ability to remove unproductive acids from the body by 50% and dramatically improves the effects of parsley’s trace minerals.

When coconut meat is added to a salad, it enhances everything else in the salad…cucumbers, tomatoes, spinach…and their healing properties. Coconut drives a food to fulfill its highest purpose as it nourishes the body.

Health Benefits of Coconut

Coconut water provides important glucose and crucial mineral salts, including potassium and sodium, to the bloodstream. This is a fundamental component of neurotransmitter production. Without these chemicals we don’t sleep well and can experience insomnia, neurological sleep apnea and other sleep disturbances. To avoid these issues, drink coconut water.

Coconut water’s trace minerals and electrolytes nourish reproductive tissue. It also helps people with hypoglycemia, diabetes and blood disorders. Coconut water is crucial for those with over or under active adrenals as well as brain and neurological disorders. It benefits people with Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and other forms of dementia. And it prevents the onset of seizures and supports eye conditions.

Consume coconut water that is clear or very slightly tinged with pink, and avoid any that contain citric acid, natural flavors, or any kind of sweeteners.

Health Benefits of Coconut

Coconut meat and the oil derived from it is antipathogenic, antibacterial, antiviral and full of antioxidant properties. As coconut moves into the intestinal tract it kills off pathogens. Plus it helps to break loose fats and push them out of the body.

I occasionally use unsweetened shredded coconut in salads or to make a healthy sugar free treat. I keep cans of unsweetened coconut milk on hand, for recipes such as madras curried lentils and sauces. Coconut oil is great to cook with, however my favorite use for the oil is to create chemical free products. My strong intention is to increase the amount of coconut water that I drink and continue reaping the benefits that this power food offers.

Health Benefits of Coconut

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Apricots

These tiny fruits that resemble miniature peaches are BIG on flavor and health benefits. They are an amazing fruit for rejuvenating the body due to being high in amino acids such as cysteine and glutamine, and minerals such as selenium and magnesium. This super food is loaded with more than 40 trace minerals and phytochemical compounds that bind to toxins such DDT buried deeply within the body, lowering the risk of many cancers.

Apricots

Apricots are a B12 enhancing food meaning they eliminate unhelpful elements in the digestive tract that get in the way of healthy B12 production. The skin of the apricot destroys mold, yeast, unneeded candida and other harmful fungus in the body, while the skin’s enzymes and coenzymes protect DNA.

Apricots reduce the gut’s production of ammonia, a destructive gas that can leach through the intestinal wall and cause problems throughout the body, from brain fog to dental issues. And apricots are an energy stabilizer that boost the growth of red blood cells, strengthening the heart and nourishing the brain. When the body’s energy reserves are low, apricots restore and replenish.

When fresh apricots are unavailable, dried apricots are a great alternative. Just make sure they are sulfur free. Dried apricots retain all their health benefits when dehydrated. The potassium level actually increases when this fruit is dried. (All info from Life Changing Foods by Anthony William.)

Apricots Dried sulfur free apricots are a golden brown color, instead of the bright orange of dried apricots that contain sulfur.

Apricots

I like using dried sulfur free apricots to make Apricot Bars, an easy and nutritious snack that is naturally sweet and chewy with the crunch of almonds. They only have four ingredients. You can find the recipe HERE

Apricots have powerful healing properties, and offer emotional support as well. They open us up, and help to calm nervousness while regulating when we need to be guarded and when we need to drop our defenses. Apricots soothe any type frustrating situation. These amazing little fruits deliver huge results in a compact package!

Apricots

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Radish Cucumber Dill Salad

As one who has recently begun to enjoy radishes, for the first time in her life, I was excited to try another wonderful looking recipe. After all, I have radishes in my refrigerator crisper to use up.

Radish Cucumber Dill Salad

This easy to prepare recipe was created by Anthony William.

Radish Cucumber Dill Salad

2 cups of radishes, thinly sliced

2 cups cucumbers, thinly sliced

2 tablespoons minced tarragon

4 tablespoons minced dill

2 tablespoons olive oil

1/4 lemon, juiced

Sea salt to taste

Place radish and cucumber slices in a medium sized bowl and toss with remaining ingredients. Chill salad in refrigerator for at least 15 minutes. Serves 2.

I used ingredients fresh from my garden, except for the radishes, to create the salad. Since I was the only one who would be eating this gorgeous salad, I cut the recipe in half, which was just the right amount. I didn’t have tarragon on hand, but I had plenty of fresh dill from my herb garden. And, in place of a lemon, I substituted a lime. The beauty of this recipe is that it can be adapted and still taste amazing.

Radish Cucumber Dill Salad

I loved the radish cucumber dill salad. It was refreshingly crunchy and the dill and sprinkle of sea salt added so much flavor. I am still astounded…at myself. I used to dislike radishes and cucumbers were marginal for me. Now, two years in on a plant based journey, I marveled at the beauty and tastiness of my lunch. And this salad is incredibly healthy for me, with the combination of powerful foods and herbs.

I chopped up a tomato from my garden, and toted it and my bowl of salad to the office, so I could eat while I prepped for a listing appointment. My pretty lunch was so satisfying, on so many different levels.

Radish Cucumber Dill Salad

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Radishes

I have had an interesting relationship with radishes. It’s not really a love/hate relationship, as I’ve disliked them since childhood. My gardener grandfather, Pop, tried unsuccessfully every spring to get me to eat one of these cruciferous veggies. It became a long running joke between us.

“Have a radish?” he would say with a grin, offering me one.

No thank you!” I would firmly reply.

It wasn’t that I was a picky eater, either. I liked most foods. I wanted to like radishes. Every once in a while, I would nibble on one, hoping it tasted differently than the last one I tried, to no avail.

Radishes

I completely abandoned any attempt to like radishes by adulthood. If they showed up in a salad, I picked them out, telling myself that I didn’t like radishes.

When I received Life Changing Foods, by Anthony William, I discovered he had devoted a section to radishes. I read through the info.

Radishes support and replenish the immune system. The sulfur in this veggie repels any type of pathogen and kills off parasites. The sulfides keep arteries and veins clean, which prevents plaque from building up. Radishes are incredible heart food, preventing cardiovascular disease and issues by increasing good cholesterol and lowering bad cholesterol. And the skin of this little root vegetable helps to prevent all types of cancers. They also restore the kidney, liver, pancreas and spleen.

With radishes, we get a two-for-one deal. Not only are the roots health boosting, the greens are one of the most prebiotic foods available, second only to wild blueberries. Radish leaves contain nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, phytochemicals and cancer fighting alkaloids, plus the greens possess antibacterial and antiviral properties. They repair the colon and parts of the intestinal tract that have lost the ability to absorb nutrients. Radish greens cleanse heavy metals from the body, removing mercury, lead, arsenic and aluminum. They also stave off neurological conditions, including MS, ALS, Parkinson’s and Lyme disease.

After reading about the extraordinary benefits radishes offer, I knew I needed to rethink my attitude about this powerful food. I’ve already discovered that my taste buds have changed since going plant based. Several other foods that I once disliked, I now enjoy.

I gave radishes another try. Pop would be proud of me. I can’t say radishes are my favorite food, however, I like them, especially combined with other foods in salads and slaws. In fact, this week I created a radish/red cabbage/carrot slaw with a zesty jalapeño dressing that I do love. See the recipe HERE.

I intend to incorporate radish greens in salads or add them to veggies to steam. And next spring, I want to grow them in my veggie bed. I can imagine my grandfather’s face brightening as he grins. “Have a radish?” At last I can answer, “Yes!”

Radishes

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Red Cabbage

Today’s featured vegetable is not only gorgeous, it delivers amazing flavor and health benefits as well. Popular for use in slaws, because of its bold color, red cabbage can be used in a variety of other tasty ways.

Red Cabbage

Red cabbage is one of the most healthful and least expensive vegetables available and it can be easily grown in a veggie garden. It is rich in vitamins C, K, and B-complex and packed with minerals such as iodine, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and iron. It is also high in anthocyanin polyphenols which are powerful antioxidants that contain potent anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, and anti-cancer properties.

Red cabbage is well known for its high percentage of phyto-chemicals such as isothiocyanates, zea-xanthin, and lutein, strange looking words that mean this vegetable can help protect the body against colon, breast, stomach, lung, and prostate cancer. It also helps lower cholesterol levels by working with bile acids in the digestive process to remove cholesterol from the blood.

Red Cabbage

Red cabbage is the perfect food to create a healthy digestive tract as it is known to help reduce bad bacteria and promote good friendly bacteria in the gut. Red cabbage is especially beneficial for the nervous system and has even been shown to help reduce the buildup of plaque in the brain that can lead to Alzheimer’s disease.

It is also an excellent food for ulcers, osteoporosis, constipation, heart disease, candida, age related macular degeneration, fibromyalgia, dementia, and weight loss. Red cabbage is also great for boosting the immune system and reducing chronic inflammation in the body. (Info from Anthony William. Check out his website HERE)

Red Cabbage

Red Cabbage

Red cabbage can be eaten raw, in salads and slaws, added to wraps and nori rolls, or juiced with other vegetables and fruits. Lightly steam or sauté red cabbage to enjoy as a colorful side dish or mix with other cooked veggies.

I top sweet potatoes with shredded red cabbage, lightly sautéed with onions and garlic. The combo of sweet potatoes and red cabbage makes a delicious and satisfying meal. My favorite way to enjoy red cabbage though is to steam it with several other veggies, in my pressure pot. In minutes I have a colorful meal that is simple, fast and full of nutrients!

Red Cabbage