The Spice of a Healthy Life: Cinnamon

This familiar spice has been used for centuries, medicinally and in the kitchen. The scent of cinnamon evokes happy feelings of warmth and home. And, as it turns out, this feel good spice promotes health and wellness also.

The Spice of a Healthy Life Cinnamon

What is Cinnamon?

Cinnamon comes from a type of tree, and the unique smell, color and flavor of the spice is a result of the oils within the tree. The health benefits of cinnamon come from the bark of the tree. This bark contains several special compounds which are responsible for its many health-promoting properties, including cinnamaldehyde, cinnamic acid and cinnamate.

The cinnamon tree is grown around the world with at least 250 species identified so far. However, there are two main types of cinnamon spice used today: Ceylon cinnamon, which is less common and sometimes labeled as true or real cinnamon, and Cassia cinnamon, which is more widely available and most often used.

The Spice of a Healthy Life Cinnamon

Health Benefits of Cinnamon

Cinnamon supplies a wide variety of nutrients and it is especially rich in fiber, manganese, calcium, iron and vitamin K. It also contains trace amounts of vitamins A, B6, C and E, and minerals such as phosphorus, sodium, potassium and zinc.

Health benefits include:

• High in antioxidants, which reduces free radical damage and slows the aging process.

• Prevents oxidative stress and nitric oxide build up in the blood, lowering the risks for brain disorders, cancer and heart disease.

• Relieves inflammation, which helps lower the risk of cognitive decline and reduces pain, muscle soreness and age related stiffness.

• Reduces high cholesterol and triglyceride levels and high blood pressure to keep the heart healthy and strong and lower the risk for strokes. Cinnamon is a helpful blood coagulant and can stop excess bleeding by helping the body to form blood clots. It also increases circulation and improves tissue repair, which may be especially helpful for regenerating heart tissue in order to help fight heart attacks, heart disease and stroke.

• Lowers blood sugar levels and improves sensitivity to insulin, which helps transport sugar from the bloodstream to the tissues to keep blood sugar levels balanced.

• Aids against the development of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

• Protects against DNA damage, cell mutation and cancerous tumor growth, especially in the colon.

• Boosts the immune system and fights against infections and viruses.

• Protects against certain strains of bacteria that cause bad breath, tooth decay, cavities and mouth infections.

• The powerful antifungal properties in cinnamon can be effective in treating and preventing Candida overgrowth in the digestive tract.

• Its antibiotic and antimicrobial properties help protect the skin from irritation, rashes, allergic reactions and infection.

• Cinnamon’s multitude of beneficial compounds help fight common allergy symptoms by reducing inflammation and fighting histamine reactions.

The Spice of a Healthy Life Cinnamon

How to Use Cinnamon

There are many ways to include cinnamon in the diet. Dried powdered cinnamon can be added to many recipes and drinks or sprinkled onto organic oatmeal or freshly sliced fruit. Cinnamon sticks flavor drinks such as hot apple cider. The bark is an ingredient in many health boosting teas and cinnamon is available in essential oil form as well.

Cinnamon should not be overused, especially the cassia variety. Taken in moderation, however, this powerful spice brings health and wellness into our lives.

My favorite way to include cinnamon this time of year is in hot apple cider and warm turmeric tea, made with almond coconut milk. Fall is all about bringing warmth and coziness into our homes. Cinnamon is an incredible way to spice up life.

The Spice of a Healthy Life Cinnamon

Hibiscus Tea

I was reminded recently about the powerful health benefits of hibiscus. There are hundreds of species of this herbal flower however Hibiscus sabdariffa is most commonly used to make hibiscus tea. As I happened to have a container of dried hibiscus, I’ve enjoyed refreshing cups of hot tea this week and renewed my appreciation for this healing plant.

Hibiscus Tea

What is Hibiscus?

This herbaceous plant is a member of the flowering mallow family. Also known as a rose mallow, the hibiscus plant produces showy flowers in a range of colors and can be either an annual or a perennial, depending on location.

Several species are widely cultivated as ornamental plants. The tea made from hibiscus flowers is known by many names around the world and can be served hot or cold. The beverage is known for its deep red color, tart flavor, and high vitamin C content.

Hibiscus Tea

Health Benefits of Hibiscus Tea

There are many known healing benefits associated with hibiscus tea.

• Rich in powerful antioxidants, the tea helps to prevent damage and disease caused by the buildup of free radicals.

• Contains hibiscus protocatechuic acid which has anti-tumor properties. Research suggests that hibiscus slows down the growth of cancerous cells by inducing apoptosis, commonly known as programmed cell death.

• Boosts and supports the immune system by providing anti-inflammatory properties.

• Rejuvenates the liver and helps to treat liver disease.

• Lowers blood pressure and cholesterol.

• Lowers the absorption of starch and glucose which may aid weight loss.

• Relieves cramps and menstrual pain. It helps to restore hormonal balance as well, which can reduce the symptoms of menstruation like mood swings, depression, and overeating.

• Satiates thirst and improves digestion.

• Calms the nervous system, and helps to reduce anxiety and depression by creating a relaxed sensation in the mind and body.

**Do not drink hibiscus tea while pregnant or if low pressure is a problem.

How to Prepare Hibiscus Tea

The tea is easy to prepare. Steep 2 – 3 teaspoons of dried hibiscus in very hot water for 15 minutes. The tea is a beautiful deep magenta color and has a tart taste similar to cranberry juice. Sweeten with raw organic honey if desired.

The tea can be chilled after brewing and served over ice for a thirst quenching cold drink as well. Add lemon or lime juice and a spoonful of honey. I appreciate sour and tart flavors more than sweet, so I don’t add honey to my tea. I love iced hibiscus tea with just fresh lemon juice added.

Dried hibiscus can be purchased at health food stores or health conscious grocery stores, or ordered by clicking the link below. Hibiscus tea bags are available as well.

I’ve just enjoyed a cup of hot hibiscus tea as I wrote about its health benefits!

Hibiscus Tea

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Calendula

This beautiful flowering plant has been used for centuries for ornamental, culinary and medicinal purposes. Calendula, also known as pot marigold, is a powerful anti-inflammatory and one of the strongest antiviral herbs.

Calendula

What is Calendula?

This flowering annual originated in western Europe, southeastern Asia and the Mediterranean. It’s commonly found in home gardens throughout the world today and easily blooms and thrives wherever it’s planted. The orange-yellow petals of the flowers are used medicinally, both externally and internally.

These petals contain high levels of antioxidants in the form of carotenoids and flavonoids. Calendula contains both lutein and beta-carotene, which the body absorbs and converts into vitamin A. The flowers also contain fatty acids and they are rich in oxygenated oils.

Calendula

Health Benefits of Calendula

• Powerful anti-inflammatory properties make it a potent remedy for issues such diaper rash, dermatitis, ear infections, ulcers and sore throats.

• Prevents and relaxes muscle spasms and cramps.

• In studies done for slow-healing wounds it was found that using calendula-based gels and topical ointments helped speed up recovery rate and healing. Even more impressive, it increases blood flow and oxygen to wounds and infected areas, which helps the body grow new tissue.

• Contains antimicrobial and antiviral compounds, making calendula effective in fighting pathogens, candida and antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria.

• Helps reduce gum inflammation and fights against gingivitis, cavities and plaque. Its astringent properties fight mouth bacteria and promote a healthy oral environment.

• Calendula improves skin firmness and hydration, creating a more youthful appearance.

• Due to its anti-inflammatory properties, calendula can help fight against cancer and irritation due to treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation.

Calendula

How to Use Calendula

The herb can be purchased in capsule, tincture, oil, lotion or ointment form. The petals can also be purchased dried, to brew tea.

This bright plant is extremely easy to grow. Sow seeds onto prepped ground in the garden or into containers. The herb will bloom all summer. Collect fresh flowers for use in salads or to brew a flavorful tea.

I add drops of calendula essential oil to the skin serum that I make, to improve skin texture and firmness. And calendula tea goes into my afternoon tea rotation during the summer months.

I appreciate this versatile herb. It is a staple of my apothecary garden, and my skin care.

Calendula

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Tips for Avoiding Seasonal Allergies, Naturally

Fall is approaching and with it comes boots and hoodies, crackling fires and hot tea, blankets and pumpkin spice…and seasonal allergies. I suffered from severe fall allergies all my adult life. As September arrived I stocked up on over the counter decongestants, allergy relief meds and ibuprofen. By Thanksgiving my eyes were usually so irritated I could not wear my contact lenses. And cough drops? I carried bags of those at all times to help stifle coughing fits.

Thankfully, allergies are in my past. I am entering my third autumn without trepidation, because I’ve implemented these tips for avoiding seasonal allergies, naturally.

Tips for Avoiding Seasonal Allergies Naturally

What causes allergies?

Allergies occur when the body reacts, or shows sensitivity to an antigen. This time of year, one in five people show a heightened sensitivity to pollen, mold and fungus spores, and ragweed. The body’s response can range from mild sniffles, itchy eyes and a dry cough, to skin rashes and hives, sinus congestion, runny nose, headaches and respiratory distress.

Allergy symptoms occur when the body responds to allergens by producing a chemical called histamine, which works to counteract the allergen. The immune system causes the allergic reactions by producing Immunoglobulin antibodies that result in widespread symptoms.

Tips for Avoiding Seasonal Allergies Naturally

Eliminate foods that create inflammation

Lessening and ultimately avoiding seasonal allergies is a two step process: eliminate foods that weaken the immune system and then support the immune system so it can work properly.

A healthy immune system can handle allergens without creating symptoms in the body. An immune system that is already overwhelmed by a body fighting inflammation and viruses can’t handle anything more.

These foods cause inflammation in the body and should be avoided, especially during allergy season:

• eggs • gluten • canola oil • soy • corn • dairy products • MSG

Dairy products create mucus in the body. Continuing to consume dairy products while fighting allergies is akin to throwing gasoline on a fire. Eggs, all eggs, feed viruses in the body such as Epstein Barr and strep, which weaken the immune system and create inflammation by way of their toxic wastes.

Strengthen the immune system

Eliminating inflammation-causing foods allows the immune system to quiet down. Eating nutrient rich, alkalizing foods strengthens the immune system, allowing it to handle allergens when they invade the body, without creating symptoms.

Include as many of these foods as possible, daily:

• wild blueberries • lemon/limes • celery • garlic • sweet potatoes • leafy greens • cruciferous veggies such as cauliflower and broccoli • onions • oranges • cranberries • raw local honey

Buy wild blueberries frozen and add to fruit smoothies. Sip on lemon or lime water first thing in the morning. Follow with the miracle drink, celery juice. (Read more about why celery juice is so good for the body.) Add extra garlic to recipes. Raw honey is crucial and it needs to be purchased locally. Bees carry local pollen. Consuming it in the honey helps the body to build up a resistance to pollens. Replace cow’s milk with coconut or almond milk in recipes and drinks.

Tips to Avoid Seasonal Allergies Naturally

Supplements to support the immune system

Finally, support the immune system with these health boosting supplements:

• turmeric • nettle • Ester C • elderberry syrup

Turmeric is one of the most powerful inflammation fighters available. Take it in capsule form or create Turmeric Milk, made with coconut milk, to sip on at night.

Stinging nettle naturally controls histamine. Take it in capsule form or purchase dried leaves to brew hot tea.

Ester C is a powerful form of vitamin C, taken in capsule form. Elderberry syrup boosts the immune system, relieves cold and allergy symptoms, and calms a cough.

Tips to Avoid Seasonal Allergies Naturally

Daily regimen to avoid allergy symptoms

Prepare for allergy season beginning in late August or early September by doing the following daily:

• Avoid inflammation causing foods.

• Eat immune boosting, alkalizing and inflammation fighting foods, as many as possible.

• Take turmeric and Ester C capsules (follow dosage instructions on the bottle) or drink a cup of turmeric milk.

• Take a spoonful of raw organic honey, locally produced, and a spoonful of elderberry syrup (I buy unsweetened syrup).

• Drink a cup of nettle tea, or take a nettle capsule.

After many years of losing seasonal allergy battles, it feels so incredibly good to know that I can enjoy fall without misery, and without the use of drugs. Food is my medicine. And I am the victor.

Tips to Avoid Seasonal Allergies Naturally

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Cilantro Lemongrass Sauce

I enjoy making my own dressings and sauces to dress up freshly prepared foods. My lemongrass plant has supplied me abundantly with leaves for hot and cold teas. I searched for a simple sauce recipe that used this fragrant herb as an ingredient. I found one that I adapted slightly that combines lemongrass with fresh cilantro, creating a flavorful sauce that makes a wonderful accompaniment for veggies.

Cilantro Lemongrass Sauce

Cilantro Lemongrass Sauce

1 tablespoon ginger, minced or finely chopped

1 garlic clove, minced

1 large bunch fresh cilantro

1 1/2 tablespoons dried or fresh lemongrass, finely chopped

1 tablespoon chili garlic sauce or sugar free sriracha sauce

1 teaspoon sea salt

1/2 cup light olive oil, extra virgin

2 tablespoons rice vinegar

1/3 cup water

Combine all ingredients in a high speed blender, blending until smooth. Makes about 1 1/2 cups of sauce. Store in refrigerator.

Cilantro Lemongrass Sauce

I snipped fresh lemongrass from the herb garden for this easy to make sauce. The consistency is thin enough to serve as a pesto with gluten free pasta. It also makes a delicious dipping sauce for nori wrapped veggie roles or fresh cut up veggies.

Today I drizzled cilantro lemongrass sauce over a veggie bowl that included half a baked potato, chopped tomatoes fresh on my garden, and avocado slices. The tangy lemony herb combined with the rich distinctive flavor of cilantro was so good. This simple sauce is already a favorite.

Cilantro Lemongrass Sauce

Lemongrass Benefits

Lemongrass is an aromatic herb in the grass family. Originally native to India, today this plant can be found in gardens around the world. This coarse grass, which grows to a height of three feet, is a perennial in tropical areas. In less warm climates it must be planted annually. The herb has been used medicinally for centuries, and for good reason. Lemongrass has many health benefits.

Lemongrass Benefits

Lemongrass is full of essential nutrients including vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, and C. It’s also high in minerals such as potassium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorous, manganese, copper, zinc and iron, which are all required for the healthy functioning of the human body.

The herb contains antioxidants, flavonoids and phenolic compounds. The main component of lemongrass is lemonal or citral, which supplies anti-fungal and anti-microbial qualities, while also providing its distinctive lemony smell.

Lemongrass Benefits

The health benefits of lemongrass include lowering cholesterol, detoxing the kidneys and liver, reducing uric acid, supporting the digestive system and inhibiting the growth of cancer cells.

Lemongrass also inhibits the formation of biofilm (bacteria that sticks together and then adheres to other surfaces) throughout the body, helps to heal gastric ulcers, and stimulates bowel function. Its antibacterial properties fight against pathogens such as H. pylori and E. coli in the digestive tract.

This herb calms muscles and nerves, helping the body to relax into sleep while increasing the duration of sleep. It helps to heal coughs and colds, lowers fevers, and reduces aches and pains including headaches, migraines, backaches, muscle spasms and cramps.

Lemongrass Benefits

Lemongrass stimulates the brain and helps combat convulsions, nervousness, vertigo, and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. It boosts the immune system, helps in strengthening skin tissue, protects cells from free radicals, cleanses the spleen, and stimulates the regeneration of cells.

Finally, lemongrass treats edema, helping the body eliminate excess fluid by cleansing lymphatic congestion.

Lemongrass is extremely easy to grow in the garden or in containers. I add a plant or two every spring to my herb garden and snip the ends of the grass blades to brew lemongrass tea. The herb may be purchased dried as well. Lemongrass can also be added to soups and sauces. I found a cilantro lemongrass dressing recipe that I am excited to try.

The flavor of lemongrass is very similar to lemon balm, and both make a refreshing hot or cold drink. Lemongrass tea is included in my rotation of herbal teas. Although I enjoy it as an afternoon tea, it is especially soothing in the evening before bedtime.

I am, in fact, enjoying a freshly brewed cup of lemongrass tea as I write this post. I know it is already sending healing benefits through my body.

Lemongrass Benefits

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Chamomile Benefits

I have associated chamomile with relaxation and a good night’s sleep. The dried flower from this healing herb makes a soothing and delicious hot tea. However chamomile, used medicinally since ancient times, has many healing benefits beyond creating drowsiness.

Chamomile Benefits

Chamomile is a member of the aster family. Two types of chamomile are commonly used for their healing benefits, the German and Roman varieties. Chamomile tea is beneficial as a sleep aid which is especially helpful for those who suffer with insomnia, sleep disturbances, a racing mind, or high anxiety and stress. However, chamomile also has other significant healing properties such as the ability to soothe a disturbed digestive system by easing flatulence, stomach aches, ulcers, and cramping, and by aiding in overall digestion and elimination.

The herb also helps to relieve bronchial and sinus congestion, calm anxiety and panic attacks, decrease menstrual cramping, ease muscle spasms, lower blood sugar, fight cancer and reduce migraine pain. Chamomile tea’s anti-inflammatory properties make it beneficial for reducing swelling associated with arthritis, fibromyalgia, and other auto-immune diseases. Chamomile tea cleanses the liver and kidneys by stimulating them to purge out toxins and eliminate them from the system.

Chamomile Benefits

Chamomile has anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties making it especially helpful in fighting against colds, flus, infections, and even Candida. Chamomile tea is excellent for children as it can calm colicky infants and teething babies as well as soothe children that are irritable, cranky, and restless. Its mild flavor is often accepted and enjoyed by children especially when sweetened with honey. As a topical remedy, cooled chamomile tea can be applied to the skin to help soothe rashes, chickenpox, psoriasis, eczema, and burns, including sunburns.

Chamomile tea can also help to relieve eye fatigue and dark circles. Apply a cooled tea bag to the eyes for five minutes at night as a gentle and effective compress. Chamomile and peppermint tea are often used in combination due to their synergistic properties to help the body cleanse, relax, and heal. (Info from the Medical Medium blog. Check it out HERE)

Chamomile Benefits

For the first time I am growing German chamomile in my herb garden this summer. My intention is to keep adding healing herbs each year, until I truly do have a complete apothecary garden available for use. Today I snipped fresh chamomile flowers to combine with dried chamomile that I had on hand. I added three teaspoons of the dried herb and a small handful of fresh blossoms to two cups of boiling water and let it steep for 15 minutes. Chamomile has a delicate floral scent and flavor. I don’t add honey. However, I am looking forward to trying out herbal combinations, such as chamomile and mint, chamomile and lavender or chamomile and lemon grass.

On this rainy day, with mild thunderstorms rolling through the area, a cup of hot chamomile tea was the perfect afternoon soother. I included a couple of homemade sugar free, gluten free cookies made from three simple ingredients, to tea time. Watch for that recipe Tuesday.

I’m sipping chamomile tea, nibbling on a cookie, and feeling grateful for the healing benefits that plants provide. This is bliss.

Chamomile Benefits

Feverfew

Feverfew is one of the medicinal herbs that I’ve been aware of for many years. Used for centuries as a proven and powerful remedy for migraines and headaches, this herb has many other health benefits as well.

Feverfew

The feverfew plant is short and bushy, with feathery leaves and white and yellow daisy-like flowers. Native to the Balkan Mountains of Eastern Europe, feverfew now grows throughout Europe and the Americas. The leaves and flowers are used medicinally, although both can be added to salads as well.

Feverfew has been called the “medieval aspirin” because of its pain relieving properties. The biochemical parthenolide is responsible for this herb’s pain easing effects. Taking feverfew daily lessens the pain of migraines and helps to prevent the reoccurrence of these debilitating headaches, by preventing the widening of blood vessels that precipitates an attack. Feverfew also relieves the symptoms that accompany migraines, including light sensitivity, nausea and vomiting.

Feverfew reduces inflammation in the nervous system as well as in the joints, making it beneficial to those suffering from arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This herb is a potent anti-inflammatory for the skin, easing redness, swelling and itchy rashes. Feverfew heals damaged skin cells, improving the appearance of the skin.

Feverfew

Research has demonstrated that feverfew has anticancer properties that inhibit the growth of cancer cells. And the herb has anti-thrombotic abilities, meaning it can help to prevent blood clots from forming and growing. This in turn improves blood circulation while reducing the risks of heart attack and stroke.

It is also helpful for these conditions: allergies, asthma, tinnitus, dizziness, infertility, stomachaches, fevers, muscle and joint stiffness, menstrual problems and psoriasis.

Feverfew may be purchased as capsules, tinctures, liquid extracts and creams, or as dried leaves and flowers, to make tea. I currently take feverfew in capsule form, although I intend to add this plant to my herb garden. Feverfew is an easy perennial to grow, in a sunny location. It can be invasive, making it a good plant to grow in a container so that it doesn’t overtake the rest of the garden. The flowers bloom from July to October.

I’m excited to include feverfew in the garden, planting it in one of my many containers, and using the leaves and flowers to make teas and tinctures.

Feverfew

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Lobelia Herb

As a gardener, I have been familiar with a variety of the lobelia plant, known for its tiny attractive purplish blue or white flowers. I’ve planted it in containers in the backyard garden. When I read the chapter on the shingles virus, in Medical Medium by Anthony William, I learned that the plant, which is technically an herb, has health benefits as well. Anthony listed lobelia as a supplement to include, to fight the shingles virus. I ordered it immediately.

Lobelia Herb

Lobelia inflata, also called Indian tobacco, was originally used, many years ago, by people suffering from nicotine withdrawal. The herb’s health benefits include stimulating the respiratory system, relaxing and opening the lungs, and easing allergy and asthma symptoms and congestion. Lobelia has expectorant properties, making it useful as well for bronchitis.

As a diaphoretic, lobelia promotes perspiration, which may not sound like a benefit, but it helps to relieve fevers by cooling the skin and rids the body of toxins, while contributing to healthy blood circulation. Diaphoretics are useful in treating diarrhea, and liver and kidney disorders.

Lobelia Herb

Lobelia is also a powerful relaxant for smooth muscles and the nervous system, providing pain relief and easing spasms, especially in the respiratory system. And as I learned in the Medical Medium book, lobelia kills the shingles virus.

I was suffering greatly from severe sciatica when I began taking lobelia. The shingles virus had kept the nerves in both legs inflamed for years. I had tried everything to ease my discomfort. So there was no hesitation on my part in eliminating certain foods from my diet, and incorporating more fruits, veggies and supplements that targeted the virus, in an attempt to heal. I began feeling a difference in my legs in the first seven days. Within a few months the pain and inflammation had disappeared.

Lobelia is available in several forms, including capsule, tincture, dried loose leaf tea and powders. It’s also found in many over the counter cold remedies. I currently take it in capsule form, but I’d love to try it dried as a tea.

Steeping a small amount of lobelia leaves with sage, chamomile and peppermint would create a soothing and relaxing hot tea. And that would provide the perfect end to a busy day.

Lobelia Herb

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Burdock Root

The benefits of this root, which can be taken as a supplement, drank as a tea or eaten as a vegetable, are many. Burdock root has a grounding ability that comes from anchoring deeply in the ground. When it comes to rehabilitating the liver, there is nothing better than this root.

Burdock Root

The liver can become filled with viruses such as Epstein Barr, shingles, HHV-6 and cytomegalovirus, and with unproductive bacteria, parasites, fungi or other pathogens. It can also become dense and harden. Burdock root strengthens and revitalizes the liver so that it can fight off pathogens. It also softens a dense stagnant liver.

Phytochemicals in burdock help to reduce the growth of cysts and adhesions in the liver, repair scar tissue and cleanse the lobes. It detoxifies the core of the liver, removing toxicity caused by metals, plastics, herbicides, and fungicides, which allows the liver to breathe.

Burdock Root The burdock plant. It is the root that is most beneficial.

Burdock root has potent antibacterial, antioxidant and anti inflammatory properties. It contains almost every known trace mineral plus vitamins A, B, C and K. It is excellent for cleansing the lymphatic system and the blood, and enhancing white blood cells to keep the lymph nodes strong so they can do their work of killing pathogens and cancer cells. Burdock also detoxifies heavy metals.

The root of the burdock can be juiced along with other vegetables, peeled like a carrot and sliced into sticks to eat raw, or chopped and added to soups. The root has a sweet, earthy taste.

Burdock Root

Or the root can be dried and finely chopped and used to make hot tea. Anthony suggests drinking a cup of burdock root tea after a massage, to enhance lymphatic drainage. And to offer burdock root tea to those who might be in need of cleansing from physical or emotional toxins. Burdock root can be taken in capsule form also.

I enjoy burdock root tea. Organic dried root can be purchased by the ounce in health food stores or health conscious grocery stores, or ordered through the links below. I add two teaspoons of the dried root to a cup of boiling water, cover, and let the tea steep for 15 minutes. The soothing tea has a mild, slightly sweet flavor.

This afternoon I paired a cup of hot burdock root tea with a bowl of fresh papaya and strawberries mixed with frozen wild blueberries. What a nourishing tea time. I know my liver thanks me for it!

Burdock Root

The information about burdock root comes primarily from Life Changing Foods by Anthony William. You can purchase the book through the link below.

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And dried burdock root for tea: