Calendula

This beautiful flowering plant has been used for centuries for ornamental, culinary and medicinal purposes. Calendula, also known as pot marigold, is a powerful anti-inflammatory and one of the strongest antiviral herbs.

Calendula

What is Calendula?

This flowering annual originated in western Europe, southeastern Asia and the Mediterranean. It’s commonly found in home gardens throughout the world today and easily blooms and thrives wherever it’s planted. The orange-yellow petals of the flowers are used medicinally, both externally and internally.

These petals contain high levels of antioxidants in the form of carotenoids and flavonoids. Calendula contains both lutein and beta-carotene, which the body absorbs and converts into vitamin A. The flowers also contain fatty acids and they are rich in oxygenated oils.

Calendula

Health Benefits of Calendula

• Powerful anti-inflammatory properties make it a potent remedy for issues such diaper rash, dermatitis, ear infections, ulcers and sore throats.

• Prevents and relaxes muscle spasms and cramps.

• In studies done for slow-healing wounds it was found that using calendula-based gels and topical ointments helped speed up recovery rate and healing. Even more impressive, it increases blood flow and oxygen to wounds and infected areas, which helps the body grow new tissue.

• Contains antimicrobial and antiviral compounds, making calendula effective in fighting pathogens, candida and antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria.

• Helps reduce gum inflammation and fights against gingivitis, cavities and plaque. Its astringent properties fight mouth bacteria and promote a healthy oral environment.

• Calendula improves skin firmness and hydration, creating a more youthful appearance.

• Due to its anti-inflammatory properties, calendula can help fight against cancer and irritation due to treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation.

Calendula

How to Use Calendula

The herb can be purchased in capsule, tincture, oil, lotion or ointment form. The petals can also be purchased dried, to brew tea.

This bright plant is extremely easy to grow. Sow seeds onto prepped ground in the garden or into containers. The herb will bloom all summer. Collect fresh flowers for use in salads or to brew a flavorful tea.

I add drops of calendula essential oil to the skin serum that I make, to improve skin texture and firmness. And calendula tea goes into my afternoon tea rotation during the summer months.

I appreciate this versatile herb. It is a staple of my apothecary garden, and my skin care.

Calendula

Order dried calendula below.

I am an Amazon Affiliate and may earn a commission on purchases, at no extra cost to you. Thank you for considering making a purchase of this product, or any other items, through my Amazon link! 

Tips for Avoiding Seasonal Allergies, Naturally

Fall is approaching and with it comes boots and hoodies, crackling fires and hot tea, blankets and pumpkin spice…and seasonal allergies. I suffered from severe fall allergies all my adult life. As September arrived I stocked up on over the counter decongestants, allergy relief meds and ibuprofen. By Thanksgiving my eyes were usually so irritated I could not wear my contact lenses. And cough drops? I carried bags of those at all times to help stifle coughing fits.

Thankfully, allergies are in my past. I am entering my third autumn without trepidation, because I’ve implemented these tips for avoiding seasonal allergies, naturally.

Tips for Avoiding Seasonal Allergies Naturally

What causes allergies?

Allergies occur when the body reacts, or shows sensitivity to an antigen. This time of year, one in five people show a heightened sensitivity to pollen, mold and fungus spores, and ragweed. The body’s response can range from mild sniffles, itchy eyes and a dry cough, to skin rashes and hives, sinus congestion, runny nose, headaches and respiratory distress.

Allergy symptoms occur when the body responds to allergens by producing a chemical called histamine, which works to counteract the allergen. The immune system causes the allergic reactions by producing Immunoglobulin antibodies that result in widespread symptoms.

Tips for Avoiding Seasonal Allergies Naturally

Eliminate foods that create inflammation

Lessening and ultimately avoiding seasonal allergies is a two step process: eliminate foods that weaken the immune system and then support the immune system so it can work properly.

A healthy immune system can handle allergens without creating symptoms in the body. An immune system that is already overwhelmed by a body fighting inflammation and viruses can’t handle anything more.

These foods cause inflammation in the body and should be avoided, especially during allergy season:

• eggs • gluten • canola oil • soy • corn • dairy products • MSG

Dairy products create mucus in the body. Continuing to consume dairy products while fighting allergies is akin to throwing gasoline on a fire. Eggs, all eggs, feed viruses in the body such as Epstein Barr and strep, which weaken the immune system and create inflammation by way of their toxic wastes.

Strengthen the immune system

Eliminating inflammation-causing foods allows the immune system to quiet down. Eating nutrient rich, alkalizing foods strengthens the immune system, allowing it to handle allergens when they invade the body, without creating symptoms.

Include as many of these foods as possible, daily:

• wild blueberries • lemon/limes • celery • garlic • sweet potatoes • leafy greens • cruciferous veggies such as cauliflower and broccoli • onions • oranges • cranberries • raw local honey

Buy wild blueberries frozen and add to fruit smoothies. Sip on lemon or lime water first thing in the morning. Follow with the miracle drink, celery juice. (Read more about why celery juice is so good for the body.) Add extra garlic to recipes. Raw honey is crucial and it needs to be purchased locally. Bees carry local pollen. Consuming it in the honey helps the body to build up a resistance to pollens. Replace cow’s milk with coconut or almond milk in recipes and drinks.

Tips to Avoid Seasonal Allergies Naturally

Supplements to support the immune system

Finally, support the immune system with these health boosting supplements:

• turmeric • nettle • Ester C • elderberry syrup

Turmeric is one of the most powerful inflammation fighters available. Take it in capsule form or create Turmeric Milk, made with coconut milk, to sip on at night.

Stinging nettle naturally controls histamine. Take it in capsule form or purchase dried leaves to brew hot tea.

Ester C is a powerful form of vitamin C, taken in capsule form. Elderberry syrup boosts the immune system, relieves cold and allergy symptoms, and calms a cough.

Tips to Avoid Seasonal Allergies Naturally

Daily regimen to avoid allergy symptoms

Prepare for allergy season beginning in late August or early September by doing the following daily:

• Avoid inflammation causing foods.

• Eat immune boosting, alkalizing and inflammation fighting foods, as many as possible.

• Take turmeric and Ester C capsules (follow dosage instructions on the bottle) or drink a cup of turmeric milk.

• Take a spoonful of raw organic honey, locally produced, and a spoonful of elderberry syrup (I buy unsweetened syrup).

• Drink a cup of nettle tea, or take a nettle capsule.

After many years of losing seasonal allergy battles, it feels so incredibly good to know that I can enjoy fall without misery, and without the use of drugs. Food is my medicine. And I am the victor.

Tips to Avoid Seasonal Allergies Naturally

Order supplements below.

I am an Amazon Affiliate and may earn a commission on purchases, at no extra cost to you. Thank you for considering making a purchase of this product, or any other items, through my Amazon link! 

Cilantro Lemongrass Sauce

I enjoy making my own dressings and sauces to dress up freshly prepared foods. My lemongrass plant has supplied me abundantly with leaves for hot and cold teas. I searched for a simple sauce recipe that used this fragrant herb as an ingredient. I found one that I adapted slightly that combines lemongrass with fresh cilantro, creating a flavorful sauce that makes a wonderful accompaniment for veggies.

Cilantro Lemongrass Sauce

Cilantro Lemongrass Sauce

1 tablespoon ginger, minced or finely chopped

1 garlic clove, minced

1 large bunch fresh cilantro

1 1/2 tablespoons dried or fresh lemongrass, finely chopped

1 tablespoon chili garlic sauce or sugar free sriracha sauce

1 teaspoon sea salt

1/2 cup light olive oil, extra virgin

2 tablespoons rice vinegar

1/3 cup water

Combine all ingredients in a high speed blender, blending until smooth. Makes about 1 1/2 cups of sauce. Store in refrigerator.

Cilantro Lemongrass Sauce

I snipped fresh lemongrass from the herb garden for this easy to make sauce. The consistency is thin enough to serve as a pesto with gluten free pasta. It also makes a delicious dipping sauce for nori wrapped veggie roles or fresh cut up veggies.

Today I drizzled cilantro lemongrass sauce over a veggie bowl that included half a baked potato, chopped tomatoes fresh on my garden, and avocado slices. The tangy lemony herb combined with the rich distinctive flavor of cilantro was so good. This simple sauce is already a favorite.

Cilantro Lemongrass Sauce

Lemongrass Benefits

Lemongrass is an aromatic herb in the grass family. Originally native to India, today this plant can be found in gardens around the world. This coarse grass, which grows to a height of three feet, is a perennial in tropical areas. In less warm climates it must be planted annually. The herb has been used medicinally for centuries, and for good reason. Lemongrass has many health benefits.

Lemongrass Benefits

Lemongrass is full of essential nutrients including vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, and C. It’s also high in minerals such as potassium, calcium, magnesium, phosphorous, manganese, copper, zinc and iron, which are all required for the healthy functioning of the human body.

The herb contains antioxidants, flavonoids and phenolic compounds. The main component of lemongrass is lemonal or citral, which supplies anti-fungal and anti-microbial qualities, while also providing its distinctive lemony smell.

Lemongrass Benefits

The health benefits of lemongrass include lowering cholesterol, detoxing the kidneys and liver, reducing uric acid, supporting the digestive system and inhibiting the growth of cancer cells.

Lemongrass also inhibits the formation of biofilm (bacteria that sticks together and then adheres to other surfaces) throughout the body, helps to heal gastric ulcers, and stimulates bowel function. Its antibacterial properties fight against pathogens such as H. pylori and E. coli in the digestive tract.

This herb calms muscles and nerves, helping the body to relax into sleep while increasing the duration of sleep. It helps to heal coughs and colds, lowers fevers, and reduces aches and pains including headaches, migraines, backaches, muscle spasms and cramps.

Lemongrass Benefits

Lemongrass stimulates the brain and helps combat convulsions, nervousness, vertigo, and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. It boosts the immune system, helps in strengthening skin tissue, protects cells from free radicals, cleanses the spleen, and stimulates the regeneration of cells.

Finally, lemongrass treats edema, helping the body eliminate excess fluid by cleansing lymphatic congestion.

Lemongrass is extremely easy to grow in the garden or in containers. I add a plant or two every spring to my herb garden and snip the ends of the grass blades to brew lemongrass tea. The herb may be purchased dried as well. Lemongrass can also be added to soups and sauces. I found a cilantro lemongrass dressing recipe that I am excited to try.

The flavor of lemongrass is very similar to lemon balm, and both make a refreshing hot or cold drink. Lemongrass tea is included in my rotation of herbal teas. Although I enjoy it as an afternoon tea, it is especially soothing in the evening before bedtime.

I am, in fact, enjoying a freshly brewed cup of lemongrass tea as I write this post. I know it is already sending healing benefits through my body.

Lemongrass Benefits

Order dried lemongrass below.

I am an Amazon Affiliate and may earn a commission on purchases, at no extra cost to you. Thank you for considering making a purchase of this product, or any other items, through my Amazon link! 

Chamomile Benefits

I have associated chamomile with relaxation and a good night’s sleep. The dried flower from this healing herb makes a soothing and delicious hot tea. However chamomile, used medicinally since ancient times, has many healing benefits beyond creating drowsiness.

Chamomile Benefits

Chamomile is a member of the aster family. Two types of chamomile are commonly used for their healing benefits, the German and Roman varieties. Chamomile tea is beneficial as a sleep aid which is especially helpful for those who suffer with insomnia, sleep disturbances, a racing mind, or high anxiety and stress. However, chamomile also has other significant healing properties such as the ability to soothe a disturbed digestive system by easing flatulence, stomach aches, ulcers, and cramping, and by aiding in overall digestion and elimination.

The herb also helps to relieve bronchial and sinus congestion, calm anxiety and panic attacks, decrease menstrual cramping, ease muscle spasms, lower blood sugar, fight cancer and reduce migraine pain. Chamomile tea’s anti-inflammatory properties make it beneficial for reducing swelling associated with arthritis, fibromyalgia, and other auto-immune diseases. Chamomile tea cleanses the liver and kidneys by stimulating them to purge out toxins and eliminate them from the system.

Chamomile Benefits

Chamomile has anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties making it especially helpful in fighting against colds, flus, infections, and even Candida. Chamomile tea is excellent for children as it can calm colicky infants and teething babies as well as soothe children that are irritable, cranky, and restless. Its mild flavor is often accepted and enjoyed by children especially when sweetened with honey. As a topical remedy, cooled chamomile tea can be applied to the skin to help soothe rashes, chickenpox, psoriasis, eczema, and burns, including sunburns.

Chamomile tea can also help to relieve eye fatigue and dark circles. Apply a cooled tea bag to the eyes for five minutes at night as a gentle and effective compress. Chamomile and peppermint tea are often used in combination due to their synergistic properties to help the body cleanse, relax, and heal. (Info from the Medical Medium blog. Check it out HERE)

Chamomile Benefits

For the first time I am growing German chamomile in my herb garden this summer. My intention is to keep adding healing herbs each year, until I truly do have a complete apothecary garden available for use. Today I snipped fresh chamomile flowers to combine with dried chamomile that I had on hand. I added three teaspoons of the dried herb and a small handful of fresh blossoms to two cups of boiling water and let it steep for 15 minutes. Chamomile has a delicate floral scent and flavor. I don’t add honey. However, I am looking forward to trying out herbal combinations, such as chamomile and mint, chamomile and lavender or chamomile and lemon grass.

On this rainy day, with mild thunderstorms rolling through the area, a cup of hot chamomile tea was the perfect afternoon soother. I included a couple of homemade sugar free, gluten free cookies made from three simple ingredients, to tea time. Watch for that recipe Tuesday.

I’m sipping chamomile tea, nibbling on a cookie, and feeling grateful for the healing benefits that plants provide. This is bliss.

Chamomile Benefits

Feverfew

Feverfew is one of the medicinal herbs that I’ve been aware of for many years. Used for centuries as a proven and powerful remedy for migraines and headaches, this herb has many other health benefits as well.

Feverfew

The feverfew plant is short and bushy, with feathery leaves and white and yellow daisy-like flowers. Native to the Balkan Mountains of Eastern Europe, feverfew now grows throughout Europe and the Americas. The leaves and flowers are used medicinally, although both can be added to salads as well.

Feverfew has been called the “medieval aspirin” because of its pain relieving properties. The biochemical parthenolide is responsible for this herb’s pain easing effects. Taking feverfew daily lessens the pain of migraines and helps to prevent the reoccurrence of these debilitating headaches, by preventing the widening of blood vessels that precipitates an attack. Feverfew also relieves the symptoms that accompany migraines, including light sensitivity, nausea and vomiting.

Feverfew reduces inflammation in the nervous system as well as in the joints, making it beneficial to those suffering from arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. This herb is a potent anti-inflammatory for the skin, easing redness, swelling and itchy rashes. Feverfew heals damaged skin cells, improving the appearance of the skin.

Feverfew

Research has demonstrated that feverfew has anticancer properties that inhibit the growth of cancer cells. And the herb has anti-thrombotic abilities, meaning it can help to prevent blood clots from forming and growing. This in turn improves blood circulation while reducing the risks of heart attack and stroke.

It is also helpful for these conditions: allergies, asthma, tinnitus, dizziness, infertility, stomachaches, fevers, muscle and joint stiffness, menstrual problems and psoriasis.

Feverfew may be purchased as capsules, tinctures, liquid extracts and creams, or as dried leaves and flowers, to make tea. I currently take feverfew in capsule form, although I intend to add this plant to my herb garden. Feverfew is an easy perennial to grow, in a sunny location. It can be invasive, making it a good plant to grow in a container so that it doesn’t overtake the rest of the garden. The flowers bloom from July to October.

I’m excited to include feverfew in the garden, planting it in one of my many containers, and using the leaves and flowers to make teas and tinctures.

Feverfew

You can order feverfew by clicking the link below.

I am an Amazon Affiliate and may earn a commission on purchases, at no extra cost to you. Thank you for considering making a purchase of this product, or any other items, through my Amazon link! 

Lobelia Herb

As a gardener, I have been familiar with a variety of the lobelia plant, known for its tiny attractive purplish blue or white flowers. I’ve planted it in containers in the backyard garden. When I read the chapter on the shingles virus, in Medical Medium by Anthony William, I learned that the plant, which is technically an herb, has health benefits as well. Anthony listed lobelia as a supplement to include, to fight the shingles virus. I ordered it immediately.

Lobelia Herb

Lobelia inflata, also called Indian tobacco, was originally used, many years ago, by people suffering from nicotine withdrawal. The herb’s health benefits include stimulating the respiratory system, relaxing and opening the lungs, and easing allergy and asthma symptoms and congestion. Lobelia has expectorant properties, making it useful as well for bronchitis.

As a diaphoretic, lobelia promotes perspiration, which may not sound like a benefit, but it helps to relieve fevers by cooling the skin and rids the body of toxins, while contributing to healthy blood circulation. Diaphoretics are useful in treating diarrhea, and liver and kidney disorders.

Lobelia Herb

Lobelia is also a powerful relaxant for smooth muscles and the nervous system, providing pain relief and easing spasms, especially in the respiratory system. And as I learned in the Medical Medium book, lobelia kills the shingles virus.

I was suffering greatly from severe sciatica when I began taking lobelia. The shingles virus had kept the nerves in both legs inflamed for years. I had tried everything to ease my discomfort. So there was no hesitation on my part in eliminating certain foods from my diet, and incorporating more fruits, veggies and supplements that targeted the virus, in an attempt to heal. I began feeling a difference in my legs in the first seven days. Within a few months the pain and inflammation had disappeared.

Lobelia is available in several forms, including capsule, tincture, dried loose leaf tea and powders. It’s also found in many over the counter cold remedies. I currently take it in capsule form, but I’d love to try it dried as a tea.

Steeping a small amount of lobelia leaves with sage, chamomile and peppermint would create a soothing and relaxing hot tea. And that would provide the perfect end to a busy day.

Lobelia Herb

Order Medical Medium, and Lobelia, by clicking the links below.

I am an Amazon Affiliate and may earn a commission on purchases, at no extra cost to you. Thank you for considering making a purchase of this product, or any other items, through my Amazon link! 

Burdock Root

The benefits of this root, which can be taken as a supplement, drank as a tea or eaten as a vegetable, are many. Burdock root has a grounding ability that comes from anchoring deeply in the ground. When it comes to rehabilitating the liver, there is nothing better than this root.

Burdock Root

The liver can become filled with viruses such as Epstein Barr, shingles, HHV-6 and cytomegalovirus, and with unproductive bacteria, parasites, fungi or other pathogens. It can also become dense and harden. Burdock root strengthens and revitalizes the liver so that it can fight off pathogens. It also softens a dense stagnant liver.

Phytochemicals in burdock help to reduce the growth of cysts and adhesions in the liver, repair scar tissue and cleanse the lobes. It detoxifies the core of the liver, removing toxicity caused by metals, plastics, herbicides, and fungicides, which allows the liver to breathe.

Burdock Root The burdock plant. It is the root that is most beneficial.

Burdock root has potent antibacterial, antioxidant and anti inflammatory properties. It contains almost every known trace mineral plus vitamins A, B, C and K. It is excellent for cleansing the lymphatic system and the blood, and enhancing white blood cells to keep the lymph nodes strong so they can do their work of killing pathogens and cancer cells. Burdock also detoxifies heavy metals.

The root of the burdock can be juiced along with other vegetables, peeled like a carrot and sliced into sticks to eat raw, or chopped and added to soups. The root has a sweet, earthy taste.

Burdock Root

Or the root can be dried and finely chopped and used to make hot tea. Anthony suggests drinking a cup of burdock root tea after a massage, to enhance lymphatic drainage. And to offer burdock root tea to those who might be in need of cleansing from physical or emotional toxins. Burdock root can be taken in capsule form also.

I enjoy burdock root tea. Organic dried root can be purchased by the ounce in health food stores or health conscious grocery stores, or ordered through the links below. I add two teaspoons of the dried root to a cup of boiling water, cover, and let the tea steep for 15 minutes. The soothing tea has a mild, slightly sweet flavor.

This afternoon I paired a cup of hot burdock root tea with a bowl of fresh papaya and strawberries mixed with frozen wild blueberries. What a nourishing tea time. I know my liver thanks me for it!

Burdock Root

The information about burdock root comes primarily from Life Changing Foods by Anthony William. You can purchase the book through the link below.

I am an Amazon Affiliate and may earn a commission on purchases, at no extra cost to you. Thank you for considering making a purchase of this product, or any other items, through my Amazon link!

Order burdock root supplements below:

And dried burdock root for tea:

Lemon Balm, Fennel & Thyme Tea

This healing tea has become my afternoon hot drink of choice as I undertake a 90 Day Thyroid Rehab. Easy to prepare and full of health benefits from three powerful herbs, I enjoy taking a midday break and sipping on this flavorful tea.

This recipe comes from Thyroid Healing, by Anthony William. Not only is the tea healing to the thyroid and body, it calms and soothes the spirit as well.

Fresh or dried lemon balm and thyme may be used. If you can’t find loose leaf herbs, tea bags may be used for lemon balm, fennel seed and thyme. Just use one tea bag of each.

I grow lemon balm and thyme in my garden. The lemon balm dies back in the fall and returns each spring. I used dried lemon balm and fennel seeds, purchased at Natural Grocers. Thyme survives the winter months. I sloshed out to the garden through pouring rain to snip a fresh sprig of aromatic thyme for my tea.

Lemon Balm soothes the nerves, especially those involved with digestion. Sensitives nerves in the digestive tract can create much discomfort and irritation. They can also trigger nausea and lack of appetite. Lemon balm helps to desensitize the nerve endings and ease inflammation. It is also high in trace minerals, helps to conserve B12 in the body, and has antiviral properties that fight against Epstein-Barr, shingles and herpetic viruses.

Fennel Seed is high in vitamin C and other antiviral compounds that fight off EBV. Fennel seeds contain an aspirin like compound that acts as an anti inflammatory to a thyroid flared up by Epstein-Barr. Calming the thyroid helps to improve its hormone production.

Thyme is a powerful antiviral that cleans up thyroid disease. Its compounds get into the gland and kill EBV, allowing the thyroid to regain control of itself. Thyme knocks down viral loads throughout the body, relieving a multitude of symptoms. This herb is also able to cross the blood-brain barrier, making it an incredible weapon against viruses that are attacking the brain or spinal cord.

In the past, I have enjoyed creating hot teas from each of these herbs. It is amazing, the health benefits, when the three are combined. This refreshing tea is mild yet full of flavor. I prefer it plain, without adding honey.

I look forward to the summer months when I can pick fresh thyme and lemon balm and create this soothing, healing tea.

You can order Thyroid Healing below:

I am an Amazon Affiliate and may earn a commission on purchases, at no extra cost to you. Thank you for considering making a purchase of this product, or any other items, through my Amazon link!

10 Herbal Teas that Will Boost Your Health

I have enjoyed drinking hot tea for years. When I visited Scotland in 2014, I adopted the custom of afternoon tea, which I still practice at home as often as I can. And what’s even better than indulging in afternoon tea? Boosting my health with one of these delicious and good for me herbal teas! 

10 Herbal Teas that Boost Your Health
1. Cat’s Claw 

This herb is one of the most powerful substances for reversing today’s epidemic of chronic and mystery illnesses. Cat’s Claw can aid in alleviating symptoms from neurological to digestive. The herb fights the pathogens that cause inflammation, including bacteria, patasites, and viruses. For the best effect, drink this tea in the evening, and avoid Cat’s Claw if you are pregnant. 

2. Lemon Balm

This herb is essential for calming nerves, especially those involved with digestion. Lemon Balm’s soothing properties calm the nerve receptors along the digestive tract so that nerves become less sensitive and inflammation reduces. Antiviral, antibacterial and anti-parasitic, Lemon Balm fights viruses such as Epstein Barr, shingles and other herpetic varieties. Plus the herb detoxifies the liver, spleen and kidneys and reduces bladder inflammation. Lemon Balm is extremely easy to grow, in the garden or in a container. Drink right before bed for a great night’s sleep. 

10 Herbal Teas that Boost Your Health
3. Licorice Root

Anthony William, the Medical Medium, calls Licorice Root one of the most important herbs in the world. Why? Because it is the ultimate weapon against viral infections. Herpetic viruses, including Epstein Barr, HHV-6, and shingles, are often behind mystery illnesses and autoimmune disorders such as fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, Lyme disease, rheumatoid arthritis and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Licorice Root also helps with low blood pressure, soothes the liver and supports the adrenals. Drink this powerful tea plain, or combine with cinnamon and cloves for a warm, fragrant treat. 

4. Raspberry Leaf

This herb is ideal for women. It protects the reproductive system and balances hormones. In addition, Raspberry Leaf supports the adrenals, and the production of estrogen, progesterone and testosterone. In fact, this crucial plant supports the entire endocrine system. For women in the child bearing years, Raspberry Leaf aids in fertility, helps to prevent miscarriage and addresses exhaustion and postpartum depression after childbirth. It also enhances the prodction of breast milk. For men Raspberry Leaf acts as a blood cleanser and an overall detoxifier. 

10 Herbal Teas That Will Boost Your Health
5. Nettle Leaf

This herb supports the body during times of stress. It also contains a vast amount of phytochemicals, making Nettle Leaf life giving, life extending and extremely anti-inflammatory. Nettle is a potent pain reliever and with more than 40 trace minerals, it is also bone building and bone protecting. For its effects to be most powerful, drink Nettle Leaf tea in the afternoon, or before meditation, as it is a very centering herb. 

6. Red Clover

Red clover is very common, and considered a weed by many. However, this herb offers powerful support to the lymphatic system, cleansing the lymph fluid. It is effective against cancer, and is a diuretic and the ultimate blood builder. Red Clover is full of nutrients and disease fighting alkaloids and it aids in breaking up and reducing stored up, unnecessary fat. This herb has an energizing effect, making a great tea when feeling exhausted, fatigued or depleted. Drink this tea in the evening so that the cleansing properties can work overnight. 

7. Rose Hips

Rose Hips contain the most bioidentical, bioavailable form of vitamin C, in a form most usable for our bodies. They are not only anti-inflammatory, they also increase our blood’s white blood count and boost our immune system. Rose Hips are helpful for battling virtually any type of infection, and brings relief to those who suffer from irregular heartbeats. They alleviate urinary tract infections and heal skin conditions.  

10 Herbal Teas That Will Boost Your Health
8. Oregano

One of a group of powerful aromatic herbs, Oregano kills off unproductive bacteria such as H pylori, Strep and E coli, which minimizes the possibility of SIBO, peptic ulcers, strep throat, sinusitis and ear infections. Long considered an important herb for cooking, Oregano makes a flavorful tea as well. 

9. Rosemary

Another antibacterial, this herb specializes in fighting antibiotic resistant bacteria, such as those found in hospitals. It is effective against C difficile and MRSA. 

10. Thyme

This herb is antiviral, enabling it to destroy viruses such as the flu, and herpetic viruses that are responsible for autoimmune diseases. Thyme has the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, making it effective against viruses that have started to attack the brain or spinal cord, resulting in neurological conditions. 

Regularly consuming these extraordinary herbal teas will boost the immune system and fight viruses and diseases. Many of these herbs can easily be grown in backyard gardens or containers. Fresh herbs may be purchased in the produce section at the grocery store or dried herbs can be found at health food stores. 

Add dried or fresh herbs to a diffuser and steep in hot water for 5-10 minutes. I often drop fresh herbs from my garden directly into the cup of hot water and cover the mug with a saucer while it steeps. 

The next time you crave a hot drink, reach for one of these health boosters instead of a coffee or hot chocolate. Your body will flourish and benefit from your healthy choice! 

10 Herbal Teas That Will Boost Your Health
Please check out Life Changing Foods, by Anthony William. I rely on the info in this amazing book every day! 


I am an Amazon Affiliate and may earn a commission on purchases, at no extra cost to you. Thank you for considering making a purchase of this product, or any other items, through my link!