Cucumber Tomato and Dill Salad

Summer heat and long sunny days create in me the desire for simple meals that don’t require cooking. It’s too warm and muggy to heat up the kitchen. I’ve been enjoying meals of watermelon or cantaloupe, leafy greens or salsas made from fresh chopped veggies. This easy cucumber and tomato salad has become one of my favorites!

Cucumber Tomato and Dill Salad

I didn’t use a recipe for this summer salad. Instead, I let intuition guide me, adding the ingredients my body craved.

Cucumber Tomato and Dill Salad

1 medium cucumber, diced

1 tomato, diced

1/4 – 1/2 red or yellow onion, finely chopped

1 tablespoon fresh or dried dill

2 tablespoons rice vinegar OR fresh lime juice

Sea salt and pepper to taste

Combine all ingredients in a small bowl. Cover and store in the refrigerator. Flavors blend and improve as salad chills.

Cucumber Tomato and Dill Salad

Cucumber Tomato and Dill Salad

My garden provides fresh cucumbers, tomatoes and dill. I’ve only needed to purchase onions from the farmer’s market or grocery store. I especially love snipping dill from my herb garden and inhaling its amazing aroma as I add it to the chopped veggies.

This salad reminds me of one my grandmother made when I was a child. The thinly sliced cucumbers and onions marinated in vinegar overnight before we enjoyed it. I limit my use of vinegar, and use rice vinegar as a healthier option, when I do use it. This salad is equally tasty made with lime juice.

Cucumber, tomato and dill salad makes a great meal on its own and also serves as an excellent side dish with other veggies, legumes or brown rice. I’m relishing this wholesome taste of summer!

Cucumber Tomato and Dill Salad

Cucumbers

The cucumber was best known to me, pre-plant based lifestyle, as a pickle that had not undergone its transformation yet. I rarely ate fresh raw cucumbers as they tended to upset my sensitive digestive system, giving me indigestion.

Oh, how things have changed.

Cucumbers

Cucumbers are wonderfully hydrating. Most people have chronic dehydration, and don’t realize it. They attempt to quench their thirst with sodas or sweet tea, which only worsens the dehydration. In addition, being chronically dehydrated has a negative effect on health.

Cucumbers have the power to hydrate the body, at a cellular level. They have cooling properties as well, making them excellent at rejuvenating a hot, stagnant liver. In fact, Anthony William writes, in Life Changing Foods, that when eaten on a daily basis, cucumbers can reverse liver damage, dialing back 10 to 15 years of toxic exposure to heavy metals, pesticides and a poor diet.

Cucumbers

Fresh cucumber juice is the most rejuvenating drink in the world. Its electrolyte compounds nourish and cool down overtaxed adrenal glands and overheated kidneys that are struggling with filtering out toxic debris. Drinking cucumber juice also helps to reduce fevers in adults and children.

Cucumbers provide vitamins A, B and C, traces of amino acids glycine and glutamine, highly active enzymes and coenzymes, and more than 50 trace minerals. They soothe anxiety and neurological conditions and support the digestive system. Cucumbers flush Epstein Barr virus neurotoxins out of the bloodstream, hydrate the lymphatic system, and cleanse the thyroid.

Cucumbers

As someone who used to only eat cucumbers in pickle form, I have greatly expanded my appreciation for this veggie, that’s actually a fruit. I’ve included them in my diet in multiple ways this week. I created a cucumber, tomato, onion and dill salad that I’ve enjoyed all week. I included chopped cucumber in a veggie bowl, topped with a homemade sauce.

And thinly sliced cucumber graced a glass of water. This evening I juiced a couple of cucumbers and carried my glass out into the garden to sip on as I water container plants. I purchase organic cucumber, and leave them unpeeled. If purchasing regular cucumbers, peel them before using.

Cucumbers

Which reminds me, I have cucumber plants growing in my raised bed vegetable garden. This is my second summer to grow them. The plants are prolific and will produce an abundance of cucumbers. I will add those cucumbers to salads and veggie bowls, and make raw noodles, flavored water and juice, hydrating and rejuvenating my body, without any digestive distress. My body has healed.

Not one of those cucumbers will become a pickle!

Cucumbers

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