Chamomile Benefits

I have associated chamomile with relaxation and a good night’s sleep. The dried flower from this healing herb makes a soothing and delicious hot tea. However chamomile, used medicinally since ancient times, has many healing benefits beyond creating drowsiness.

Chamomile Benefits

Chamomile is a member of the aster family. Two types of chamomile are commonly used for their healing benefits, the German and Roman varieties. Chamomile tea is beneficial as a sleep aid which is especially helpful for those who suffer with insomnia, sleep disturbances, a racing mind, or high anxiety and stress. However, chamomile also has other significant healing properties such as the ability to soothe a disturbed digestive system by easing flatulence, stomach aches, ulcers, and cramping, and by aiding in overall digestion and elimination.

The herb also helps to relieve bronchial and sinus congestion, calm anxiety and panic attacks, decrease menstrual cramping, ease muscle spasms, lower blood sugar, fight cancer and reduce migraine pain. Chamomile tea’s anti-inflammatory properties make it beneficial for reducing swelling associated with arthritis, fibromyalgia, and other auto-immune diseases. Chamomile tea cleanses the liver and kidneys by stimulating them to purge out toxins and eliminate them from the system.

Chamomile Benefits

Chamomile has anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties making it especially helpful in fighting against colds, flus, infections, and even Candida. Chamomile tea is excellent for children as it can calm colicky infants and teething babies as well as soothe children that are irritable, cranky, and restless. Its mild flavor is often accepted and enjoyed by children especially when sweetened with honey. As a topical remedy, cooled chamomile tea can be applied to the skin to help soothe rashes, chickenpox, psoriasis, eczema, and burns, including sunburns.

Chamomile tea can also help to relieve eye fatigue and dark circles. Apply a cooled tea bag to the eyes for five minutes at night as a gentle and effective compress. Chamomile and peppermint tea are often used in combination due to their synergistic properties to help the body cleanse, relax, and heal. (Info from the Medical Medium blog. Check it out HERE)

Chamomile Benefits

For the first time I am growing German chamomile in my herb garden this summer. My intention is to keep adding healing herbs each year, until I truly do have a complete apothecary garden available for use. Today I snipped fresh chamomile flowers to combine with dried chamomile that I had on hand. I added three teaspoons of the dried herb and a small handful of fresh blossoms to two cups of boiling water and let it steep for 15 minutes. Chamomile has a delicate floral scent and flavor. I don’t add honey. However, I am looking forward to trying out herbal combinations, such as chamomile and mint, chamomile and lavender or chamomile and lemon grass.

On this rainy day, with mild thunderstorms rolling through the area, a cup of hot chamomile tea was the perfect afternoon soother. I included a couple of homemade sugar free, gluten free cookies made from three simple ingredients, to tea time. Watch for that recipe Tuesday.

I’m sipping chamomile tea, nibbling on a cookie, and feeling grateful for the healing benefits that plants provide. This is bliss.

Chamomile Benefits

Nettle Leaf

I first became aware of this plant as a youth. Brushing bare arms or legs against it could result in a temporary stinging sensation. Stinging nettles were something I learned to avoid. However, long before I switched to a plant based lifestyle, I discovered the surprising benefits of drinking nettle tea.

Nettle Leaf

This adaptogenic herb provides support for our bodies during times of stress. The leaves contain vast amounts of phytochemicals, anti-inflammatories and alkaloids. Nettle leaf is also full of bone building and bone protecting silica, 40+ trace minerals, and it contains a potent natural pain reliever.

This wild food, that many consider a weed, provides amazing support for the adrenal glands and the endocrine system that are often overburdened, overworked and fatigued. Adrenal fatigue can severely affect women in particular, causing reproductive system symptoms such as hormonal imbalance, infertility and perimenopause. The problem can be that the adrenals need help, rather than the reproductive system. Nettle helps to address multiple sources of hormone disruption.

Nettle Leaf

Nettle leaf eases infections in the urinary tract, bladder and kidneys, and fights against cystitis and reproductive cancers. It’s a powerful ally against viruses such as Epstein Barr and shingles, and helps the body to recover from rheumatoid arthritis, post traumatic stress disorders, autoimmune diseases, anxiety, depression and mood swings.

For the greatest benefit from this centering herb, use it in dried form to create tea. I buy dried nettle leaf by the ounce. It’s available in health food stores and health conscious grocery stores. Add a couple of teaspoons of dried nettle to a tea ball or mesh basket and drop into a tea cup or mug. Fill cup with boiling water, cover and steep for at least five minutes. Other dried herbs can be combined with nettle leaf, for unique blends. Raw organic honey or a squeeze of lemon can be added as well.

Nettle Leaf

I have gone from avoiding the plant to regularly drinking a cup of nettle tea during my afternoon tea time. The hot tea brings comfort and a sense of settling and centering to my busy mind.

Nettle brings that same sense of wellbeing to my body as it provides healing and restoration. When I’ve had a stressful day this is my go to herbal tea. I am extremely grateful for this incredible plant.

Nettle Leaf

You can purchase Life Changing Foods, by Anthony William, by clicking link below.

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Dandelion Tea

Warm temperatures today and the arrival of spring tomorrow lured me outdoors this afternoon. I enjoyed the meditative task of transferring young flowering plants to clay pots, and strolling through my awakening gardens. One of the harbingers of spring is the appearance of bright yellow dandelions. For the first time, I gathered tender green dandelion leaves, and the sunny blooms, and created a healthy tea. 

Dandelion Tea
Most people consider the dandelion to be an obnoxious weed. However every part of the plant is edible and there are many health benefits associated with this spring flower. 

According to Anthony William, in his book Life Changing Foods, the dandelion’s defining characteristic is bitterness, and it is that very property that is restorative to the body. Says Anthony, “Dandelions shake you out of hibernation, getting your blood pumping and your organs cleaning house from radiation, toxic heavy metals, DDT, and other poisons.” 

Dandelion Tea

The dandelion flower, which is mildly bitter, cleanses the hollow organs such as the stomach, intestinal tract, gallbladder, bladder, lungs, uterus and heart. The leaves, being slightly more bitter, purify the blood and cleanse the lymphatic system. 

The stem, more bitter still, cleanses dense organs such as the spleen, liver and brain. And the root, which is the most bitter part of the plant, purifies those dense organs at a deep level. 

These cleansing properties make dandelion helpful for conditions such as lymphoma, kidney stones, obesity, blood disorders, inflammation, infections, liver disorders, digestive problems and fluid retention. 

Dandelion Tea
I was excited to try a healing tea, made from the tender young plants popping up in the backyard. I plucked six yellow blossoms and four leaves to make dandelion tea. I soaked the flowers and leaves in cold water while I heated a cup of water, and then rinsed them well. 

I have found that using a mesh wire basket in a tea mug is a great way to brew fresh herbs. You can pick up your own handy set through the link below. I steeped the flowers and leaves for 20 minutes, covering the mug with its lid. 

Dandelion Tea
Dandelion Tea
Curious about the degree of bitterness, I chewed on a dandelion leaf, and then popped a whole flower into my mouth, while the tea brewed. Although the blossom was slightly sweeter, both were fairly bitter, and yet entirely edible. I didn’t mind the taste at all. 

After 20 minutes, I cautiously sipped my hot tea. What a wonderful surprise! The tea wasn’t nearly as bitter as the fresh leaves and flowers. Light and refreshing, the tea had an earthly taste that was pleasing and grounding. I didn’t add raw honey, choosing to drink it without. 

In the past, I have been diligent about removing dandelions from my yard and garden. I will still remove them. But what a bountiful harvest I will have, for soups, salads and the healthy and cleansing dandelion tea. It is the perfect spring drink. 

Dandelion Tea
Check out Life Changing Foods for more incredile heslth information. And get your own tea brewing mug. I love the ease of creating teas from freshly picked herbs and plants. 

I am an Amazon Affiliate and may earn a commission on purchases, at no extra cost to you. Thank you for considering making a purchase of these products, or any other items, through my Amazon links!